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Many people choosing between 16:9 and 4:3 TVs wonder how much picture they'll be missing when viewing differently shaped programs. When a normal, 4:3 TV displays DVD or other wide-screen video, black bars, known as letterbox bars, typically appear above and below the wide-screen image. Conversely, regular programs shown on a wide-screen TV may have bars to either side of the picture. In both cases, some of the screen goes unused and the picture you're watching appears smaller.Many people choosing between 16:9 and 4:3 TVs wonder how much picture they'll be missing when viewing differently shaped programs. When a normal, 4:3 TV displays DVD or other wide-screen video, black bars, known as letterbox bars, typically appear above and below the wide-screen image. Conversely, regular programs shown on a wide-screen TV may have bars to either side of the picture. In both cases, some of the screen goes unused and the picture you're watching appears smaller. Many people choosing between 16:9 and 4:3 TVs wonder how much pictur

's game play was characterized by several features which set it apart from less acclaimed first-person shooter games at its time:

* Storyline Execution: Halo's gameplay and storyline have been known for being tightly interwoven, delivering a convincing manner being consistent with the flow of the game.
   * Vehicular Incorporation: Despite being a first-person shooter, Halo includes the option for players to control multiple vehicles, both ground based and air types (although in third-person view.) This third-person vantage brings a welcomed sense of immersion and enhances the specific points of gameplay, again setting Halo apart from its time and genre.
   * Weapons System: Halo's new weapons system was unique in two major respects; the first being its allowance of only two weapons to be carried at any given time (forcing the player to make trade-offs as they progressed throughout the game), and the second being its implication of a separate button used for the throwing of grenades.
   * Artificial Intelligence: Halo's AI was quite sophisticated for its era. With a brand new advanced AI system, actions performed by the AI such as panicking after the death of a superior, diving out of the way of an oncoming vehicle, or taking cover from explosives and suppressive fire, helped Halo stand out from the rest of the first-person shooters being released at the time.

Movement in Halo is quite similar to other first-person shooters (FPS), allowing the player to move forwards, backwards, and strafe left and right independently of their aim. On the Xbox, moving and aiming are normally separated between the two joysticks; and on the PC, between the mouse and the keyboard. Halo also allows the player to crouch and jump, although jumping from a high ledge will often result in death, or at least major fall damage. Damage from falling can be reduced or negated entirely with a well-timed crouch right as one lands. Additionally, if one crouches at the peak of his jump, he will be able to land on something slightly taller than if he were to jump without crouching. Also, if the player is jumping from a cliff, he can make sure he is touching the wall periodically while he is falling. This will count as if he is touching floor, and every time the player touches the wall, the damage counter goes to zero. [edit] Levels Of Difficulty

There are little summaries that tell of the difficulties.

* Easy: Your foes cower and fall before your unstoppable onslaught, yet final victory will leave you wanting more.
   * Normal: Hordes of aliens vie to destroy you, but nerves of steel and a quick trigger finger give you a solid chance to prevail.
   * Heroic: Your enemies are as numerous as they are ferocious; their attacks are devastating. Survival is not guaranteed.
   * Legendary: You face opponents who have never known defeat, who laugh in alien tongues at your efforts to survive. This is suicide.

[edit] Damage System

Main article: Health
* Health: The player in Halo has a limited, non self-regenerating health, which can be fully restored by picking up health-packs (This aspect of the game was changed in Halo 2). Running completely out of health will result in death, but having lower health does not impede player actions. A player's health can only be reduced if his shields have been depleted. If the player's health is at minimal levels they will faintly hear the Master Chief's heartbeat. When the non-regenerative health idea was abandoned in Halo 2 the med packs disappeared completely.
   * Shields: Master Chief's MJOLNIR Mk. V armor has a built-in shield, which protects all parts of his body from damage. The shield will decrease in strength every time it is hit by a weapon (The amount of one's shield drain depends upon the weapon it is being attacked by), and will fail after taking enough hits, but will quickly regenerate if it is not hit for a brief period of time. The shield represents a marked departure from most first-person shooters, in which one's health bar is basically augmented by picking up "armor," and it is entirely possible, in the single-player campaign at least, to simply not have enough health points to survive the next section of game-play. Halo players, on the other hand, have a more-or-less permanent buffer of health at their disposal (assuming they manage to find time to regenerate the shield), making it less of a disaster to take hits in combat.

[edit] Power Ups

There are three power ups available in Halo:

* Health Pack: (White octagon with red cross) Fully restores the player's health.
   * Active Camouflage: Drastically reduces the player's visibility for approximately 45 seconds, making all but a faint outline of him transparent. This effect is reduced or void if the player is hit by weapons fire, fires their weapon, or when time runs out.
   * Overshield: An enhanced, non-regenerating shield which is two times, (three times on enemies) the strength of the normal one. The overshield functions on top of the regular shield; when it is active, the normal shield does not take damage. In the single player game, the overshield is reduced only when the player is hit, while in the multiplayer game, it weakens gradually over time. One fully charged Plasma Pistol shot can take out the overshield and regular shield entirely. Additionally, while the over shield is charging, the player is completely invincible against almost every type of damage. The player can still be killed by assassination, however.

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